Why Mediation?

Author:  Stephanie Camins – MA, LPC  

Why Mediation?
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Benefits of mediation

  • Voluntary
  • Confidential
  • Impartial
  • Time Saving
  • Empowering
  • Flexible
  • Cost Effective
  • Cooperative
  • Respectful

What is Mediation?

Mediation is a cooperative, problem solving process, which aids parties in exchanging views and exploring solutions to conflicts. It is an informal, voluntary and confidential process. Mediators are trained, neutral third parties who assist people in reaching a mutually acceptable settlement. A mediator guides the communication process so that parties can manage emotions and reach an agreement which respects the needs of all individuals involved.

How Does Mediation Work?

All parties must first agree to participate in the mediation process. Sessions are usually scheduled for a 2 hour duration. Additional meetings are scheduled as necessary. The session begins with an explanation of the process. Each party is then encouraged to present their views. The mediator facilitates discussion and problem solving to aid parties in developing an agreement. Upon the completion of an agreement, the mediator will document the specifications and provide copies for each party to sign. Mediation agreements are informal documents unless incorporated into a court order or divorce decree.

What Types of Problems Can Be Mediated?

I specialize in Adult Family Conflicts and Divorce and Child Custody issues. Adult family conflicts include, adult siblings working to agree on eldercare issues for their parents, step family or in law problems. Plans for children include parenting time and decision making authority. We aim to help parents understand the developmental needs of children and make decisions which reflect their best interests. Effective conflict resolution aids in the adjustment to divorce, leads to better agreements and improves co-parenting relationships.

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2018-10-06T16:47:28+00:00